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Bring Music Making To Your Classroom

Welcome to making music with Guitars in the Classroom!

If you are a first time music maker, a musician seeking the chance to brush up or learn more, or a musically active person wanting to lead music in your classroom, our programs can be a great place to accomplish your goals.

We’re here to help you develop musical leadership skills and tools that will help you infuse lessons across the academic curriculum with music making and songs that boost student engagement and learning. You’ll learn wonderful songs, and you will also write songs that fit your curriculum!

We are here to help you find your musical voice so you can love singing. Most teachers tell us they are shower singers on day one, but those feelings quickly dissolve as teachers realize they are better singers than they knew. Learning to breathe properly, sing in a good range for your voice, and to relax when you sing are really helpful strategies. The most important thing is to have fun, and we do lots of that in class.

When you take the courageous step of sharing music with your students, they will be more than appreciative! They will be supportive and beg for more. Teachers tell us when they start leading music two things happen. “The hug factor” goes up and students tell them they are really cool for playing the guitar at school.  And it’s true.

Leading music for learning in your classroom will music draw your students into learning experiences, hold their attention, unlock their creativity, tune them into their inner thoughts and to one another as a group, and the lessons they learn through song will remain in their memories long after those lessons end. In fact, they will be singing those songs forty years from now and remembering you. (We are not making this up.)

Here are some reasons why bringing music into your classroom is helpful and important:


M
usic makes learning at school especially meaningful, lively, and fun. Students love it, respond immediately to the sound of the guitar, and ask for more. It becomes a special way to interact and learn that enriches life in the classroom.

Understanding how students respond to music helps you identify and address their learning styles and strengths. It lets you bring out the best in students who often struggle with more traditional modes of learning, and it creates active learning.

Student language and literacy skills blossom through song-based lessons because they get more oral language practice. English learners, and children with developmental delays and language challenges all experience great benefit from singing in class! Some non-verbal students will even speak for the first time.

Integrating Music builds students’ self-esteem and self-confidence through creative risk taking and sharing, and by giving students a chance to express themselves in class. Shy children overcome their fear of being heard, and children with attention issues focus better and achieve more academically when they can sing.

Cultural diversity can be embraced, explored, and celebrated through making music from the rich heritages and traditions that are near and dear to your students’ hearts. Mutli-cultural music will expand horizons while bringing students together in appreciation for where they come from, and who they can choose to become.

GITC will also help you make your classroom a happier place.

Singing together relieves students’ stress, improves their motivation, increases engagement, and triggers their memory. If you sing to start the day, sing before tests, sing through transitions, and sing to say good-bye, students will feel great and so will you. Plus they’ll learn more.

Why?

Because making music lowers “the affective filter” in classrooms, helping everyone relax, join together in song, and absorb information. The more relaxed we feel, the more we can take in, and the more we will want to remember.  It’s easier to memorize language when it is embedded in a melody. We can also remember things in the correct order from a song (this is called “auditory sequential memory”).

So welcome to GITC. We’re glad you’re here! Plus join us for a class.

 “Guitars in the Classroom has expanded my way to reach the multiple intelligences of my students.  Through this course, I have learned the basics of guitar strumming, but more importantly I have been able to learn academic songs to share in my class.  I have also learned how to write songs and “piggy back” onto existing tunes to relay information taught in class.  This has been a great way to review information with children and to teach them information, such as the events that led to Thanksgiving or the growth of a plant.” Danielle Holt, GITC California
“The children love the addition of informative songs.  I often hear then singing them to themselves throughout the day.  I have always sung songs with the students, but this allowed me one more way to reach the diversity of needs in my classroom.” Tammie McGee , GITC Rutland, Vermont